Is Alaska an alimony state?

Is Alaska an alimony state?

Alaska has different kinds of alimony. Alaska courts can award alimony or support “for a limited or indefinite period of time, in gross or in installments.” This means that if the judge decides to award alimony to the obligee, the obligor might have to pay it permanently or just for a set period of time.

How long do you have to be married to get half of assets?

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Any assets acquired during a marriage (that are not gifts or inheritances or acquired by non-marital funds, such as an inheritance) are considered marital assets subject to equitable distribution. It doesn’t matter whether the marriage is 6 months long or 16 years long.

Can my husband take everything in a divorce?

The unfortunate reality is that he/she may certainly try to take everything, or at least an unfair share. The rule is that the community property must be divided 50/50, according to “no fault” principles. Each spouse has a fiduciary duty to disclose all assets (and income, expenses and debts).

Does my wife get half if she cheated on me?

A spouse cheating has nothing to do with division of community property. This is a no fault divorce state so the only issues are generally financial and custody of children.

Why does the wife get the house in a divorce?

If that spouse takes specific steps to keep the house as a separate asset during the marriage, then he or she will get to keep the house in a divorce. If a spouse moves in and starts making contributions to paying the mortgage and the upkeep of the home, then the house can become a marital asset.

What determines who gets the house in a divorce?

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In most divorces, the marital home is a couple’s biggest asset. If a judge determines that the marital home is one spouse’s separate property, the solution is simple: the spouse who owns it, gets it. It’s a lot more complicated when the family home is a marital asset.

Who gets the house in a divorce in Maine?

In practice, judges in an equitable-distribution state like Maine often divide marital property with approximately 2/3 of marital assets going to the higher-earning spouse, and 1/3 going to the lower-earning spouse.