What is the difference between the petitioner and respondent?

What is the difference between the petitioner and respondent?

“Petitioner” refers to the party who petitioned the Supreme Court to review the case. “Respondent” refers to the party being sued or tried and is also known as the appellee.

What does co petitioner mean?

\u2326 Co-Petitioner: The person filing the Petition with the Court together with the. Petitioner. \u2326 Respondent: The person served a Petition for Dissolution or Legal Separation who.

Is it better to be the petitioner or the respondent in a divorce UK?

There is often very little advantage or disadvantage to being the petitioner as opposed to the respondent. As the petitioner is the party effectively bringing the divorce, unless they are relying upon the parties having been separated for more than 2 years, they will have to assign some form of blame to the respondent.

Is it worth defending a divorce?

In almost all divorces, there is no benefit in pursuing a defended divorce. If you receive a behaviour petition and you do not accept the allegations, it may be possible to amend the petition in such a way that is acceptable to both parties. All the Court would see is the petition proceeding on an undefended basis.

On what grounds can you contest a divorce?

There are only very limited grounds for opposing a divorce. It is not enough that you do not want a divorce or you want to get back together. As the only ground for divorce is the irretrievable breakdown of marriage, the only way to stop the divorce is to show that this has not occurred.

How do I protect myself in a divorce case?

How to Represent Yourself in a Divorce Court without a LawyerIf you get the chance, go to the court beforehand and observe. Know the local rules. On the day of your proceeding, dress and act in the same way you would for a job interview.Make sure you bring everything and everyone you need to court. Observe all of the common courtesies.Weitere Eintr├Ąge…

What can I expect at my first divorce hearing?

At the Divorce hearing, the Court will only consider whether your divorce should be granted. The Court will not care why you are getting divorced, nor will they consider any parenting, property settlement, spousal maintenance, child support or other issues.

Why would a divorce go to trial?

A divorce trial is when you and your spouse cannot agree on some or all of the issues in your divorce and you need to have a judge make the final call. More often, however, the judge needs to go back and review all the evidence and make a judge decision for the case.