How long can a US citizen stay in Nigeria?

How long can a US citizen stay in Nigeria?

The Nigerian tourist or business visa is typically issued for entry within ninety days of the date of issue for stays of 7 to 90 days, as granted by the Embassy. The visit must be completed prior to the expiration date of the visa. The multiple entry visa is valid six months for a stay of 7-90 days on per visit.

How much does it cost to marry a Filipino?

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So if you are an American citizen, marrying a Filipino woman will cost you 3,500-7,500 USD. These expenses include mail order bride sites services, visiting your Filipino bride in Manila, and bringing her to the US.

Is my marriage in the Philippines legal in the US?

You may be able to get married in the U.S. if you’re still legally married in the Philippines (or any other country), but the USCIS and U.S. Department of State are not going to accept that as a legal marriage. Please contact a family attorney in the Philippines if this is your situation.

Can you get married to avoid deportation?

The short answer is no. Marriage alone won’t stop deportation or prevent you from being deported in the future. But, marriage to a US citizen can make it easier to establish your legal status in the United States.

How long do you have to stay married to get a green card?

The total wait time for a marriage-based green card ranges between 10 to 38 months, depending on whether you are married to a U.S. citizen or green card holder and where you currently live (not including possible delays).

Can I take away my husband’s green card?

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If you obtained your green card through marriage to a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, a divorce (or annulment) may pose a problem. The good news is that there is nothing in the law saying that, once you are divorced or your marriage is annulled, your efforts to get a green card are automatically over.

What if my spouse and I live apart from each other green card?

It is possible to get a green card when you are living apart and having marital difficulties, so long as you have not gone so far as to get a legal separation (which is possible in some, but not all U.S. states) or actually gotten divorced.