How much does it cost to file for a divorce in Indiana?

How much does it cost to file for a divorce in Indiana?

The court will charge a filing fee which will vary between $132 and $152, depending on which county you are in. You usually have to pay this fee in cash or by certified check or money order. You should check with your local court clerk’s office to find out your county’s exact fee.

Can you file for a divorce online in Indiana?

filing for divorce online

For those seeking an inexpensive divorce in the state of Indiana, online divorce is an easy, affordable and fast solution. Online divorce may be appropriate for couples who have an uncontested case. The step-by-step process of preparing divorce documents at Onlinedivorce.com makes it easy on you.

Can you file for divorce in Indiana without a lawyer?

It would be easier if you have an attorney, because the attorney is familiar with the divorce laws and with the courts. However, there is no requirement that you have an attorney to file a divorce, and if you cannot get an attorney, you can file the divorce on your own.

How much does it cost to file for divorce in Lake County Indiana?

Filing fees for divorce in Lake County The court filing fee, which is between $132 and $152 in Indiana, is mandatory for every couple. The spouses should check with the local Court Clerk’s Office to find out the exact amount.

What is a wife entitled to in a divorce in Indiana?

All property of the husband and wife is considered “marital property.” This means that even property brought into the marriage by one person becomes marital property that will be split in half in a divorce. However, the court does not have to give each spouse one half of the property.

Can you sue for adultery in Indiana?

filing for divorce online

Unlike some other states that have retained fault-based grounds for divorce, infidelity is not grounds for divorce in Indiana. The only time adultery has an impact on a divorce case is if one spouse used marriage assets to pay for the affair.

How is alimony calculated in Indiana?

The duration of payments is determined by a judge in Indiana family court. Alimony length is usually based on length of marriage – one commonly used standard for alimony duration is that 1 year of alimony is paid every three years of marriage (however, this is not always the case in every state or with every judge).

How long does divorce take in Indiana?

60 days

Does it matter who files for divorce first in Indiana?

Yes. It does not matter who files for divorce; the wife can get her maiden or former name back as part of the final divorce as long as she asks the court to do this.

What is the fastest way to get a divorce in Indiana?

An uncontested divorce can be pretty quick if you meet Indiana’s residency requirements. Before you can file for divorce in the state, you or your spouse must have been living in Indiana for six months. You’ll need to file your divorce case in the county in which you have lived for the past three months.

How are marital assets divided in a divorce in Indiana?

Indiana is an equitable property division state, meaning that the court will divide property in the way it sees as most fair, not necessarily equally. In many cases, spouses cannot agree on how to divide their assets and debts, so they need the court to decide.

Who pays for a divorce in Indiana?

Under the English Rule, the prevailing (winning) party generally paid the others legal fees. The American Rule is much different. With it, each side pays their own legal fees. There are three (3) major exceptions.

Is Indiana a marital state?

Indiana operates under the “one pot” theory of marital property. All property belonging to either or both spouses is considered marital property. However, the court can consider whether that property should be set aside to the spouse who inherited it or brought it into the marriage.

Is Indiana common law state?

Indiana does not recognize common law marriages; however, Indiana does recognize cohabitation between unmarried parties. As defined in Bright v. Kuehl, cohabitation exists when parties live together without subsequent marriage. If the cohabitation ends, however, divorce law does not apply.

What are grounds for divorce in Indiana?

Grounds for Divorce in Indiana In Indiana, the grounds for divorce are: Irretrievable breakdown of the marriage; Conviction of a felony (after the marriage); Impotence, if it existed at the time of the marriage; and.